Rookery

Black currants on the shrub

After I obtained certification, we lived at a rental in Halifax West that over 6 years became a proof of concept for edible landscaping and permaculture principles. The edible landscape optimized a sunny yet compact property. The first year we got a yield from annuals and from the second year on from perennial crops. Soil quality improved and we saw more bird and insect diversity in the yard. Though the front was too polluted to grow food, our pollinator habitat was in bloom from March until December and attracted wasps that contribute to pest control.

The garden relied on perennial and tree crops. In a space of less than 200 square feet we grew four kinds of raspberries, cherries, red, black and hedge currants, hazelnut, herbs, annual vegetables, quince, hardy kiwi, mayapple, fiddlehead, bunching onions, asparagus, grape, haskap, sasakatoon berry, mints, sunchokes, and more. We incorporated swales and the land was mostly no-mow. All organics were composted on site. Most years we averaged 30 pounds of produce with very little effort.

An early spring harvest of rhubarb, fiddleheads, solomon seal, asparagus, shallots, chives and wintercress
An early spring harvest of rhubarb, fiddleheads, solomon seal, asparagus, shallots, chives and wintercress
A late summer harvest of zucchini, tomatoes and cucumber
A late summer harvest of zucchini, tomatoes and cucumber
A vase with lillies and brown eyed susans on a wood porch
Some of our flowers
Ruckbeckia
Pollinator hedge